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Home » Exploring the Depths of Arundhati Roy’s ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’: A Literary Analysis

Exploring the Depths of Arundhati Roy’s ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’: A Literary Analysis

Arundhati Roy’s “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a thought-provoking essay that delves into the complex issues of globalization, capitalism, and imperialism. In this literary analysis, we will explore the depths of Roy’s writing, examining her use of language, imagery, and themes to convey her powerful message about the dangers of unchecked corporate power and the need for global resistance. Through a close reading of the text, we will uncover the underlying themes and ideas that make this essay such a powerful and important piece of literature.

The Historical Context of ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

The historical context of Arundhati Roy’s essay “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is crucial to understanding the author’s perspective on the United States’ foreign policy and its impact on the world. The essay was written in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, a time when the US government was ramping up its military presence in the Middle East and Afghanistan. Roy’s essay is a scathing critique of the US government’s use of military force and its role as a global superpower. She argues that the US is using its military might to impose its will on other countries and that this is leading to a dangerous escalation of violence and conflict. Roy’s essay is also a commentary on the growing economic inequality in the world and the role that multinational corporations play in perpetuating this inequality. Overall, the historical context of “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is one of global instability and conflict, and Roy’s essay is a powerful indictment of the US government’s role in exacerbating these problems.

The Political Themes of ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

Arundhati Roy’s ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’ is a powerful critique of the political and economic systems that govern our world. The book explores themes of imperialism, capitalism, and the role of the state in perpetuating inequality and injustice. Through her writing, Roy challenges readers to question the status quo and to imagine a different kind of world, one that is more just and equitable for all. At its core, ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’ is a call to action, urging readers to take a stand against the forces of oppression and to work towards a better future for all.

The Symbolism in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In Arundhati Roy’s essay “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” the author uses powerful symbolism to convey her message about the destructive nature of capitalism and imperialism. One of the most striking symbols in the essay is the checkbook, which represents the economic power that drives Western imperialism. Roy argues that the West uses its economic power to control and exploit developing countries, often through the use of military force. The checkbook, therefore, becomes a symbol of the West’s ability to buy and sell entire nations, reducing them to mere commodities in the global marketplace.

Another important symbol in the essay is the cruise missile, which represents the military power that the West uses to enforce its economic dominance. Roy argues that the West uses military force to protect its economic interests, often at the expense of the people in the countries it invades. The cruise missile, therefore, becomes a symbol of the West’s willingness to use violence to maintain its power and control.

Through these powerful symbols, Roy exposes the destructive nature of capitalism and imperialism, and calls for a more just and equitable global order. By exploring the depths of these symbols, readers can gain a deeper understanding of the complex issues at the heart of Roy’s essay, and the urgent need for change in the world today.

The Characters in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

The characters in Arundhati Roy’s “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” are complex and multifaceted, each representing different aspects of the political and social issues that the story addresses. The protagonist, Anjum, is a transgender woman who struggles to find acceptance and belonging in a society that is deeply prejudiced against her. Her journey is one of self-discovery and empowerment, as she learns to embrace her identity and fight for her rights.

Another important character is Musa, a Kashmiri freedom fighter who is driven by a deep sense of injustice and a desire for independence. His story highlights the ongoing conflict between India and Pakistan over the disputed region of Kashmir, and the human toll that this conflict has taken on the people who live there.

Other characters include Tilo, a social activist who is torn between her commitment to her cause and her love for Musa; and Biplab Dasgupta, a corrupt government official who represents the greed and corruption that pervades Indian politics.

Through these characters, Roy explores a range of themes, including gender identity, political conflict, social justice, and corruption. Each character is a fully realized individual, with their own motivations, fears, and desires, and together they create a rich and complex tapestry of human experience.

The Narrative Structure of ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

The narrative structure of Arundhati Roy’s “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is complex and multi-layered. The essay is divided into several sections, each of which explores a different aspect of the relationship between the United States and India. The sections are not arranged in a linear fashion, but rather are interconnected and interdependent, creating a web of ideas and themes that build upon each other.

At the heart of the essay is Roy’s critique of the neoliberal economic policies that have been imposed on India by the United States and other Western powers. She argues that these policies have led to the exploitation of India’s natural resources and the impoverishment of its people. Roy also examines the role of the United States in global politics, particularly its use of military force to maintain its hegemony.

Throughout the essay, Roy employs a variety of narrative techniques to convey her message. She uses personal anecdotes, historical examples, and political analysis to create a rich and nuanced portrait of the issues at hand. She also employs a range of rhetorical devices, including irony, sarcasm, and humor, to engage the reader and make her arguments more persuasive.

Overall, the narrative structure of “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a testament to Roy’s skill as a writer and thinker. By weaving together multiple threads of argument and analysis, she creates a powerful and compelling critique of the global political and economic system.

The Use of Language in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

Arundhati Roy’s “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a powerful piece of writing that uses language to convey a strong message about the impact of globalization and capitalism on the world. Throughout the essay, Roy employs a variety of rhetorical strategies to make her point, including vivid imagery, metaphor, and irony. One of the most striking aspects of her writing is the way she uses language to draw attention to the contradictions and hypocrisies of the global economic system. For example, she notes that while the United States spends billions of dollars on weapons of mass destruction, it also claims to be promoting democracy and human rights around the world. This kind of language is designed to expose the double standards and inconsistencies of American foreign policy, and to challenge readers to think critically about the role of the United States in the world today. Overall, Roy’s use of language in “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a powerful tool for raising awareness about the complex issues facing our world today, and for inspiring readers to take action to create a more just and equitable society.

The Role of Women in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In Arundhati Roy’s “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” women play a crucial role in the narrative. The author highlights the ways in which women are often marginalized and oppressed in society, particularly in the context of war and globalization. Through the character of Anjum, a transgender woman who runs a guesthouse in Delhi, Roy explores the intersections of gender, sexuality, and class. Anjum’s experiences of discrimination and violence are emblematic of the struggles faced by many women in India and around the world. Similarly, the character of Tilo, a young woman who becomes involved in the anti-globalization movement, represents the power of women to resist and challenge oppressive systems. Overall, Roy’s novel underscores the importance of centering women’s voices and experiences in discussions of politics and social justice.

The Critique of Neoliberalism in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy offers a scathing critique of neoliberalism, the economic ideology that prioritizes free markets and individualism over government intervention and social welfare. Roy argues that neoliberalism has led to a global system of inequality and exploitation, where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. She points to the devastating effects of neoliberal policies on countries like India, where privatization and deregulation have led to the displacement of millions of people and the destruction of the environment. Roy also takes aim at the military-industrial complex, which she sees as a key component of neoliberalism. She argues that the arms trade is driven by profit, not security, and that it perpetuates violence and war around the world. Overall, Roy’s critique of neoliberalism is a powerful indictment of a system that she sees as fundamentally unjust and unsustainable.

The Significance of the Title ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

The title of a book is often the first thing that catches a reader’s attention. In the case of Arundhati Roy’s essay collection, “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” the title is both intriguing and thought-provoking. The juxtaposition of two seemingly unrelated objects – a checkbook and a cruise missile – immediately raises questions about the connection between the two.

At its core, the title speaks to the intersection of economics and war. The checkbook represents the financial power that drives much of global politics, while the cruise missile symbolizes the military might that is often used to enforce those economic interests. Roy’s essays explore the ways in which these two forces are intertwined, and how they shape the world we live in.

But the title also has a deeper significance. It speaks to the idea that money and violence are two sides of the same coin – that the power to control resources and the power to use force are intimately linked. In a world where economic inequality and military conflict are both on the rise, this message is more relevant than ever.

Overall, the title “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a powerful statement about the forces that shape our world. It invites readers to think critically about the connections between money and violence, and to consider the ways in which these forces can be harnessed for good or for ill. As such, it sets the stage for a thought-provoking and insightful exploration of some of the most pressing issues of our time.

The Relationship between India and the West in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy explores the complex relationship between India and the West. She delves into the history of colonialism and imperialism, and how it has shaped the current power dynamics between the two regions. Roy argues that India’s economic growth and development have come at a cost, as it has become increasingly dependent on Western investment and aid. This has led to a loss of sovereignty and a perpetuation of neocolonialism. Additionally, Roy critiques the West’s role in perpetuating conflicts in India, particularly in Kashmir. She argues that the West’s support of India’s military actions in the region is hypocritical, as it goes against their supposed values of democracy and human rights. Overall, Roy’s analysis highlights the complexities and contradictions in the relationship between India and the West, and calls for a reevaluation of the power dynamics at play.

The Importance of Environmentalism in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy emphasizes the importance of environmentalism in the face of rampant capitalism and militarism. Throughout the essay, she highlights the devastating effects of industrialization and globalization on the natural world, from the destruction of forests and rivers to the pollution of air and water. Roy argues that these environmental issues are not separate from political and economic concerns, but rather are deeply intertwined with them. She writes, “The environment is not a peripheral issue. It is not a luxury. It is not something that can be put on hold while other ‘more pressing’ issues are dealt with. The environment is the foundation on which all life is based. It is the foundation of all economies, all cultures, all progress.” By foregrounding the importance of environmentalism, Roy challenges readers to consider the long-term consequences of our actions and to prioritize the health of the planet over short-term gains.

The Impact of Globalization in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy explores the impact of globalization on the world, particularly on developing countries. She argues that globalization has led to the exploitation of resources and people in these countries, as multinational corporations seek to maximize profits at any cost. This has resulted in environmental degradation, social inequality, and political instability.

Roy also highlights the role of the United States in promoting and enforcing globalization, using its military power to protect its economic interests around the world. She criticizes the use of military force as a means of achieving political and economic objectives, arguing that it only leads to more violence and suffering.

Overall, “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” offers a powerful critique of globalization and its impact on the world. Roy’s analysis is both insightful and thought-provoking, challenging readers to consider the ethical implications of our global economic system.

The Exploration of Power in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy explores the concept of power and its various forms. Through her writing, she highlights the ways in which power can be wielded by governments, corporations, and individuals, and the impact that this has on society as a whole. One of the key themes that emerges from the text is the idea that power is often used to maintain the status quo, rather than to effect positive change. This is particularly evident in the way that governments and corporations use their power to exploit natural resources and marginalized communities, often at the expense of the environment and human rights. Roy’s exploration of power is both thought-provoking and challenging, forcing readers to confront their own assumptions about the nature of power and its role in society.

The Representation of Violence in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy presents a scathing critique of the violence perpetuated by the United States government in the name of democracy and freedom. Through her vivid descriptions of the devastation wrought by American military interventions in countries like Iraq and Afghanistan, Roy exposes the hypocrisy and brutality of American foreign policy. However, what is perhaps most striking about Roy’s portrayal of violence is the way in which she refuses to sensationalize or glorify it. Instead, she presents violence as a deeply disturbing and tragic reality that leaves lasting scars on both the victims and the perpetrators. By doing so, Roy challenges readers to confront the true cost of war and to question the narratives that justify it.

The Portrayal of Religion in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy portrays religion as a tool for political manipulation and control. Throughout the essay, she highlights how religion is used to justify violence and oppression, particularly in the context of the conflict between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. Roy argues that both Hindu and Muslim extremists use religion to further their own agendas, often at the expense of innocent civilians caught in the crossfire. She also critiques the role of the Indian government in perpetuating this cycle of violence, pointing out how they use religion to distract from larger issues of corruption and inequality. Overall, Roy’s portrayal of religion in “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile” is a scathing critique of how it can be used to justify and perpetuate violence and oppression.

The Use of Irony in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy employs irony to highlight the absurdity of the global arms race and the destructive consequences of war. The title itself is ironic, as it juxtaposes the mundane act of balancing a checkbook with the deadly force of a cruise missile. This contrast sets the tone for the rest of the essay, which uses irony to expose the hypocrisy and greed of those who profit from war. For example, Roy notes that the United States, which spends billions of dollars on military technology, is also the largest debtor nation in the world. This irony underscores the fact that the pursuit of military power often comes at the expense of economic stability and social welfare. Similarly, Roy points out the absurdity of using weapons of mass destruction to fight terrorism, arguing that such tactics only create more violence and suffering. By using irony to expose the contradictions and follies of the arms race, Roy challenges readers to question the logic of war and to consider alternative paths towards peace and justice.

The Role of Literature in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy uses literature as a tool to explore the complex issues surrounding globalization and its impact on society. Through her writing, Roy highlights the power dynamics at play in the world and the ways in which they are perpetuated by those in positions of authority. She also delves into the human cost of globalization, examining the lives of those who are most affected by it. By using literature to explore these themes, Roy is able to create a powerful narrative that engages readers on both an intellectual and emotional level. Through her writing, she challenges readers to think critically about the world around them and to consider the ways in which they can work to create a more just and equitable society.

The Connection between Personal and Political in ‘The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile’

In “The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile,” Arundhati Roy explores the connection between personal and political issues. She argues that the personal is political, and that the decisions we make in our personal lives have a direct impact on the political landscape. Roy uses examples from her own life to illustrate this point, such as her decision to boycott Coca-Cola due to their exploitation of water resources in India. She also discusses the larger political implications of issues such as corporate globalization and the arms race. By connecting personal choices to larger political issues, Roy highlights the importance of individual agency in shaping the world around us.